• Maya

The Strange Power of History, Hope and Faith: The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury

Updated: Sep 21



A man's body is completely tattooed with stories that come alive (somewhat literally) as he is observed by another.


Ray Bradbury, who wrote prolifically between the 1940s to late 1970s is probably best known for Farenheit 451, his social criticism on censorship. Many of Bradbury's stories, such as Farenheit 451, Something Wicked This Way Comes and The Illustrated Man were made into movies, while others were adapted for television and appeared in The Ray Bradbury Theater (1985 - 92).


The plots of these eighteen short stories take place in all sorts of locations in our interplanetary system and are the stuff of Alfred Hitchcock, Twilight Zone, and reality. Bradbury's 'science fiction' touches on themes of social prejudices, mores, politics and racial tension, highlighting how hope and faith can be a game changer. Like Orwell's 1984, Bradbury's "fanciful" stories were prophetic and are pertinent today and well worth a read or re-read.


7 views
 

Subscribe Form

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

©2020 by Turquoise Maya. Photographs and art work, except book jackets in the reviews, are the property of Turquoise Maya LLC. This is a personal blog and any views or opinions represented here are the owner's personal expressions, do not represent those of others and are free to change. These contemplations and expressions are not intended to malign any individuals, groups or collectives of any race, gender or religion. This blog is purely for informational and entertainment purposes and the owner claims no liability for losses, injuries or negative outcomes from the display or use of this information. Comments are welcome, however the blog owner reserves the right to edit or delete comments submitted to this blog without notice if they are deemed to be inappropriate, offensive or questionable. The blog owner is not responsible for content in the comments. This blog disclaimer is subject to change without notice.